How To Trademark a T-shirt Slogan

Check out Heather A. Sapp’s, Senior Trademark Attorney at LegalForce RAPC, guest post on MerchInformer.   She has created a step by step guide on how to trademark a t-shirt slogan.  Below is an excerpt from the article.  Please click HERE to read the full article.


The proliferation of print-on-demand t-shirt services such as Merch by Amazon, CafePress, and Zazzle means that anyone with an internet connection can be a fashion designer. But with this ease also comes the risk that someone will copy your design and post it on a different site. Or even that you may find yourself inadvertently infringing someone’s else’s design.

So what can the aspiring designer do to protect herself?

The two main types of intellectual property protection that cover t-shirt design are trademark and copyright. For the purposes of this article, I will focus on trademark law, but do understand that designs may also be copyrighted provided they meet the requisite standards of sufficient original expression.

Trademarks

A trademark is a symbol, word, or words legally registered or established by use as representing a company or product. A trademark typically protects brand names and logos used on goods and services. In the U.S., trademark rights are established by using the mark, regardless of whether the mark is actually registered. That being said, there are important procedural advantages to registration.

The purpose of registering a trademark is […]

 To continue reading the full article, please click HERE

Print Friendly
SHARE
Previous articleMoana and Intellectual Property
Next articleDonald Trump and the USPTO
HEATHER A. SAPP, is the Senior Trademark Attorney at LegalForce RAPC. Prior to joining LegalForce, Heather was a Trademark Examining Attorney at the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office for more than a decade. Prior to joining the USPTO, she was a Legal Fellow for the House of Representatives IP Subcommittee. She is also a popular speaker on the writers’ conference circuit, speaking on intellectual property issues for authors under her Young Adult fiction pen name, Amanda Brice.